Stehekin River

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    • #128466
      Tom Eggert
      Participant

        Hello all,

        I have about 4 weeks off this summer, and I’m trying to plan a few backpacking trips. I have been to Sahale peak/Boston peak a couple times, and it has made me want to go over cascade pass into Stehekin Valley and try fishing on the river, maybe add a couple day trips into higher lakes along the way. I don’t know how great the fishing is, but the idea of getting to a very remote river is appealing. I am curious if anyone here has done this and entered from the cascade pass end? Specifically, I’m curious how far downstream you need to travel before the river becomes fishable/productive. I have the time to do the whole length if necessary. Alternatively I could start from Stehekin, but I have imagined doing this as an out and back from cascade pass rather than a through hike as I anticipate leaving my car at the sahale/cascade trailhead. Thanks!

        Tom

      • #128468
        Brian Curtis
        Keymaster

          This is a great question. I’m not sure how far down the river you would need to go to find fish, but my best guess is that you wouldn’t have to go very far. I’m going to hazard a guess fish will start showing pretty much as soon as you get off the steep hillside and hit the valley bottom.

        • #128509
          Tom Eggert
          Participant

            Thanks Brian!

          • #128563
            Brian
            Participant

              I admittedly have a screw or two loose but I was on a fishing trip of a river near the ALW with a friend when we crossed a bridge on a popular trail over a maybe 20′ x 15′ pool in this creek. My friend had a 9′ 4 weight fly rod, and I had a couple of Tenkara rods. I looked at that little pool and said “I KNOW there are fish in that pool, I want to catch one”. My friend laughed me and sat down to take a drink of water and munch on a Larabar. I took two minutes to string up a level line pre-rigged with a pheasant tail Sakasa fly on a T-rod. On the first cast a small fish went for it but missed. 2nd cast hooked, landed and released a 6″ native Cutthroat. Couple more casts and a 2nd identical fish hooked, landed and released. After looking at a map I think I figured the creek is at about an 11% gradient in and out of that pool.

              Most folks with any sense are looking for bigger fish, but fish can be found in pools on some pretty high gradient streams. The question is if your gear can effectively fish the small pools that can hold surprisingly large fish.

              • This reply was modified 5 months, 1 week ago by Brian.
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              • #128567
                Brian Curtis
                Keymaster

                  Nice! It can be surprising just how small creeks can be that have fish. Often the fish got there because they dropped down from stocked lakes. And way back in the day Trail Blazers often stocked mountain streams.

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